DTA

Digital Theses Archive

 

Tesi etd-05122022-122947

Type of thesis
Master di Primo Livello
Author
STING, HANNES
URN
etd-05122022-122947
Title
How Ending Violence Can Be Key In Fighting Culturally Legitimated Slavery. Illustrated With The Example Of Caste-Based Slavery In India And Nepal
Structure
Istituto di Diritto, Politica e Sviluppo
Course
Corsi Alta Formazione - MASTER IN HUMAN RIGHTS AND CONFLICT MANAGEMENT
Committee
relatore Dott. Gabriella Arcadu
Membro BENVENUTO, PAOLO
Membro PIRAS, ELISA
Keywords
  • Nessuna parola chiave trovata
Exam session start date
18/05/2022;
Availability
parziale
Abstract
Thorough statistics estimate a total number of 40 million people enslaved today. Remarkably, this number has never been higher in the history of mankind. At its quantitative peak, modern slavery has attracted the attention of numerous developmental policy experts, which led to a wide range of legislative and developmental countermeasures. However, these efforts were frequently limited to the economic and global perspective – and neglected examining regional dynamics. To this end, this thesis explores the extent to which slave practices are still legitimated or accepted in cultures. Furthermore, it examines the impact of direct, structural and cultural violence on culturally legitimated slavery. To illustrate this, the dissertation analyses caste-based slavery in India and Nepal. The research methodology combines an extensive literature analysis with a standardized interview that was conducted with four international experts and affected persons of caste-based discrimination in India and Nepal. The research shows that modern slavery is still legitimated in many cultures. As a multi-facetted phenomenon, the impact of culturally inherent narratives that favour slavery must be highlighted and analysed when planning countermeasures. Such analyses need to be conducted on regional levels, considering local characteristics. Within the scope of this dissertation, there is a particular focus on two aspects that require evaluation: First, a profile of affected victims of culturally legitimated slavery. In fact, unspoken justifications vary depending on the group of people that is involved. Consequently, countermeasures must be designed on this basis. Second, an analysis of the cultural embeddedness of legitimated slavery. Culturally inherent notions that support slavery differ greatly. In some cases, slavery is legitimated through fundamental beliefs, in other cases it continues merely for the fact that it is accepted in a culture. Regional dynamics need to be evaluated along this spectrum, as necessary countermeasures vary depending on the deep-rootedness of culturally legitimated slavery. Once the root of cultural slavery is analysed, its causes must be addressed through a wide range of measures. Security serves as the fundament in this process, as it provides for efforts to become effective. Initially, security measures protect discriminated and vulnerable minority groups from direct violence and raise offender’s accountability. By this means, it creates a safe space for empowerment in a bottom-up approach. This process is frequently responded to by aggressive counter-movements of beneficiaries of the status quo and, therefore, requires a shift from violence from private actors to the state.
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