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Tesi etd-11132020-131004

Type of thesis
Corsi integrativi di II livello
Author
GUARINO, LUCA
URN
etd-11132020-131004
Title
Fixed-wing perching: prototyping and dynamic analysis
Structure
Cl. Sc. Sperimentali - Ingegneria
Course
INGEGNERIA - INGEGNERIA
Committee
relatore Prof. CASTOLDI, PIERO
Presidente Prof. FRISOLI, ANTONIO
Membro Prof. STEFANINI, CESARE
Membro Dott. AVIZZANO, CARLO ALBERTO
Membro Prof. BUTTAZZO, GIORGIO CARLO
Membro Prof. CUCINOTTA, TOMMASO
Membro Prof. DI PASQUALE, FABRIZIO CESARE FILIPPO
Membro Prof.ssa MENCIASSI, ARIANNA
Membro Prof. MICERA, SILVESTRO
Keywords
  • Nessuna parola chiave trovata
Exam session start date
15/12/2020;
Availability
parziale
Abstract
The use of UAVs for industrial applications, such as surveillance and inspection of remote buildings or other large structures, has evolved considerably in recent years. Since both favorable aerodynamic effects and efficient energy conversion diminish with scale, the utility of UAVs can be much improved and their mission extended if they collect data at lower energetic cost by perching, i.e. grab, stay attached and detach from a non-conventional surface such as a vertical wall, a pipe or a line.<br><br><br>This project aims to design a drone for power-lines inspection, combining the advantages of a fixed-wing drone – i.e. greater flight range and higher payload at the same power output than a multi-rotor – and a mechanical device that allows perching without the use of a difficult-to-control maneuver to bleed off kinetic energy before perching.<br>The solution presented here consists of a passive, three-fingered, tendon-driven gripper connected to an energy-absorbing structure that can be used to perch and then later detach from a power-line cable. The whole mechanism has a total mass of 180 grams and it does not require any external source of power to grasp the power-line and stay attached to it, but only a lightweight (9.9 g) servomotor to reopen the gripper afterward, detaching from the cable.<br><br><br>The analysis of the mechanical behavior is presented. Experimental tests were performed to characterize the gripper, the energy-absorbing structure and, after the integration with the drone, a mock perching test demonstrated the feasibility of the design. Finally, a detailed analysis of the data captured during tests has been performed to define the range of speed and impact energy in which the mechanism actually works.
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