DTA

Digital Theses Archive

 

Tesi etd-12012020-123119

Type of thesis
Corsi integrativi di II livello
Author
GRAZIOLI, SIMONA
URN
etd-12012020-123119
Title
Synthetic genomics: time for large-scale engineering in higher eukaryotes
Structure
Cl. Sc. Sperimentali - Agraria
Course
SCIENZE AGRARIE E BIOTECNOLOGIE - SCIENZE AGRARIE E BIOTECNOLOGIE
Committee
Presidente Prof. PE', MARIO ENRICO
Membro Dott. DELL'ACQUA, MATTEO
Membro Prof.ssa MENSUALI, ANNA
Membro Prof.ssa PUCCIARIELLO, CHIARA
Membro Prof. SEBASTIANI, LUCA
Membro Dott.ssa MOONEN, ANNA CAMILLA
Membro Dott.ssa BARTOLINI, SUSANNA
Keywords
  • Nessuna parola chiave trovata
Exam session start date
15/12/2020;
Availability
parziale
Abstract
Rewriting and recoding microbial genomes (e.g. E. coli and yeast) has been demonstrated, offering remarkable opportunities for biotechnological development and basic science discoveries. However, genome recoding of higher eukaryotes such as plants or mammals is still a sought-after goal of synthetic biology. The key step of this purpose is the development of methods to build large synthetic genomes, which are two to three orders of magnitude bigger and very repetitive compared to E. coli or yeast. This knowledge can be used to make complex genomes with compressed genetic codes. Some codons can then be reassigned to non-canonical amino acids (ncAAs) and used to genetically encode new functions into mammalian and plant cells.<br><br>Nowadays available techniques have mostly been explored in mammalian cells, whereas the plant sector is starting only now to use them, with promising results. In this thesis, I will address the latest and most important advances in synthetic genomics and their applicability to large genome recoding efforts. Because of the different level of progress, I will mostly focus on techniques developed in mammalian cells; however, I will also provide some insight into the new range of opportunities provided by their application to plants. <br><br>Finally, I will outline some ideas for the development of efficient, iterative and convergent methodologies for mammalian whole-genome assembly and recoding. As plant synthetic genomics is currently at an earlier stage, it appears convenient to start from the animal kingdom; however, the plant kingdom would surely profit from this advance in knowledge. The technologies developed in a similar project would make a significant contribution to understand the function and complex regulation of higher eukaryotic genomes and would provide tools to correct or design large genomic regions.
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